Podcasts

Listen to our scholars’ own voices in our podcast collection.


In this Community Room podcast episode, Dr. Sabre Cherkowski, Professor and Director of Graduate Programs and Research in the Okanagan School of Education, discusses “Creating Flourishing Schools.” She also shares details about her research in this field, the importance of the wellness of staff in schools, mindfulness, the role of a principal in this endeavor and more.


Mental Health and Exercise

February 15, 2022
episode 25: part 2 of 2

January 14, 2022
episode 24: part 1 of 2

In this Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology podcast episode, Dr. Guy Faulkner, Professor, School of Kinesiology, Dr. Madelaine Gierc and Joseph Gibbons discuss the importance of mental health and the role exercise professionals can play in assisting their clients and colleagues in maintaining good mental health.


As part of the Anti-Racism in the EdTechnosphere Speaker Series, hosts Dr. Samia Khan, Director, Master of Educational Technology and Associate Professor, Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy, and Dr. Keri Ewart, Lecturer, Master of Educational Technology, spoke with Alex DeForge and Meera Dhebar to discuss racism and the 2SLGBTQIA+ community with a focus on tackling the problem through educational technology and critical literacy.


In this Ethics and Education podcast episode, Dr. Christopher Martin, Associate Professor, Okanagan School of Education and Dr. Harry Brighouse discuss the purpose of higher education, the right to higher education, whether or not education should be compulsory after the age of 18, and whether or not tuition should be free. They also examine civic education, elite institutions, selection processes and more.


In this Green Dreamer podcast episode, Dr. Vanessa Andreotti, Professor, Department of Educational Studies, discusses what it might mean for humanity to reach a level of maturation to confront the multilayered crises we now face—calling upon us to “grow up and show up” for ourselves and our planet. She also examines how recognizing the differing historical contexts in which we were raised helps us have more empathy when navigating our generational differences.


In this Ways of Knowing podcast episode, Dr. Michelle Stack, Associate Professor, Department of Educational Studies and Dr. Cilla Ross discuss what happens when we think beyond education as a public good and about the possibilities of a cooperative university. They explore how co-ops could and are transforming higher education, as well as what it means for education to “build back better after the pandemic.”


Folk Phenomenology

June 1 to November 16, 2021
20 episodes

Dr. Samuel (Sam) Rocha, Associate Professor, Department of Educational Studies, hosts a podcast series which highlights an array of topics, including the art of interviews, tragicomic, writing and composition, philosophy and math, abolition and immigration, liberation theology, racism and Black joy, debate and delight, critical race theory, capitalism, music and more.


In this Society for the History of Children and Youth’s podcast episode, Dr. Jason Ellis, Associate Professor, Department of Educational Studies and Mallory Davies (Master of Arts, Department of Educational Studies) discuss A Class By Themselves?: The Origins of Special Education in Toronto and Beyond. The book provides an erudite and balanced history of special needs education, an early twentieth century educational innovation that continues to polarize school communities across Canada, the United States, and beyond. Dr. Ellis situates the evolution of this educational innovation in its proper historical context to explore the rise of intelligence testing, the decline of child labour and rise of vocational guidance, emerging trends in mental hygiene and child psychology, and the implementation of a new progressive curriculum. At the core of this study are the students. The book is the first to draw deeply on rich archival sources, including 1000 pupil records of young people with learning difficulties, who attended public schools between 1918 and 1945. Dr. Ellis uses these records to retell individual stories that illuminate how disability filtered down through the school system’s many nooks and crannies to mark disabled students as different from (and often inferior to) other school children. The book sheds new light on these and other issues by bringing special education’s curious past to bear on its constantly contested present.


In this CBC episode of On the Coast with Gloria Macarenko, Dr. Bonny Norton, FRSC, Professory, Department of Language and Literacy Education, discusses the UBC Heritage Language Teaching Workshop, which provided an opportunity for language instructors to exchange ideas and learn from each other, and an opportunity for educators to engage the general public. It also inspired the wider teacher-learner community to consider heritage learners’ cultural backgrounds and learning needs when designing a curriculum. Dr. Norton also discusses the Global Storybooks Project and its relevance to imagined identities and Bangla heritage language learning in community programs in metro Vancouver.


In this Society for Learning Analytics Research (SoLAR) Spotlight podcast episode (episode 12), Leah Macfadyen, Assistant Professor of Teaching, Department of Language and Literacy Education, and Associate Director, Master of Educational Technology Program and Danny Liu (University of Sydney, Australia) discuss the importance of learning analytics practitioners and the pragmatisms in translating learning analytics research into real classroom practice.


Stories and Tools for Community-engaged Learning

August 6, 2019 to April 9, 2021
seven episodes

In this seven-part Roots to Partnership podcast series, Dr. Alison Taylor, Professor, Department of Educational Studies and Stephanie Glick (PhD candidate, Department of Educational Studies) host discussions with community partners, instructors, and students involved in community-engaged learning. This series is part of a Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund (TLEF) project entitled “The Learning Exchange as a Hub of Experiential Learning,” which enriches student learning by supporting innovative and effective educational enhancements.


In this TheCommentary.ca podcast episode, Dr. Derek Gladwin, Assistant Professor, Department of Language and Literacy Education, discusses his new book, Rewriting Our Stories: Education, Empowerment, and Well-being, which explores harnessing the therapeutic power of storytelling to convert feelings of fear and powerlessness into affirmative life narratives. Visit derekgladwin.com to learn more.


In this 93.1 Life FM (Ireland) podcast episode, Dr. Derek Gladwin, Assistant Professor, Department of Language and Literacy Education, discusses how his book, Rewriting Our Stories: Education, Empowerment, and Well-being, harnesses the therapeutic power of storytelling to convert feelings of fear and powerlessness into affirmative life narratives.


In this Optimal Living Daily podcast episode (episode 1945), the host reads an excerpt from Rewriting Our Stories: Education, Empowerment, and Well-being, authored by Dr. Derek Gladwin, Assistant Professor, Department of Language and Literacy Education. The book explores how to rewrite and transform recurring negative stories to achieve greater empowerment and well-being.


In this Blue Hour podcast episode, Dr. Bonny Norton, FRSC, Professor, Department of Language and Literacy Education, discusses what it means to be multilingual in our ever-changing world, as well as the complex relationships between language, power and identity. Born and raised in Johannesburg, South Africa, in the turbulent apartheid years, Dr. Norton learned about the complex relationships between language, power, and identity at an early age. Now, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a Distinguished University Scholar in the University of British Columbia, her passion for social justice and the role of language education in social change has fuelled her extensive body of research in North America and Africa. Her research focuses on promoting multilingual literacy for children, youth, and adults and is informed by her seminal work on identity and language learning, described in her 2010 AERA award as “changing the face of second language research.”


Episode 17: Samuel D. Rocha

November 5, 2020

In this episode of Fooknconversations, Dr. Nicholas Ng-A-Fook interviews Dr. Samuel D. Rocha, Associate Professor, Department of Educational Studies, . During their conversation, Dr. Rocha shares his perspectives as a phenomenologist, musician, artist, and Mexican-American in relation to the 2020 United States election and The Syllabus as Curriculum. They discuss some of the following concepts: experiencing and crossing intellectual and material borders, folk phenomenology, reductions of time and memory, “art precedes metaphysics” and the “offering,” playing jazz, hegemonic presence of social sciences in Faculties of Education, a non-Apology of the humanities, posthumanism and post-qualitative research, promethean forewarnings, teacher as luthier, cheeky questions, shitty curriculum, teacher education, and so much more.


Grease Trail Digital Storytelling

July 29, 2020
seven episodes

Dr. Johanna Sam, Assistant Professor, Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, and Special Education and Indigenous teacher candidates in rural communities across British Columbia created a seven-part podcast series to enhance the preservation and accessibility of Indigenous histories, stories and memories embedded in local landscapes. Through digital teaching and learning contexts, they explored this land-based experiential learning opportunity, engaged in traditional Indigenous storytelling practices, and situated the projected within the principles of:

  • Respect: Understand local Indigenous knowledges to expand Indigenous-focused digital curricular
  • Relevance: Develop digital storytelling as an instructional tool to enhance learning
  • Responsibility: Provide land-based learning opportunities to build capacity for diversity and inclusion in teaching and learning contexts
  • Reciprocity: Create open Indigenous digital storytelling educational resources for schools and Indigenous communities


In this Mind Full: Canadian Psychological Association podcast episode, Dr. Anusha Kassan, Associate Professor, Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, and Special Education, shares how she helped launch an innovative program to increase diversity in counselling psychology programs. She discusses the lack of diversity in mental health professionals and how psychologists can prepare to help people deal with racial trauma.


In this SAra and GEorge (SAGE) Psychology and Psychiatry podcast episode, Dr. Anita Hubley, Professor, Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, and Special Education, and her former student Zachary Cornfield (Master of Arts, Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, and Special Education) discuss their article, “Counsellors’ Attitudes Toward Working with Clients with Substance Use Disorders.” The article explores Substance Use Disorders (SUDs), a significant and growing problem in all walks of life in Canada and the United States. Counsellors are increasingly likely to have clients with SUDs regardless of their area of expertise. However, there is limited research on counsellors’ attitudes towards working with clients with SUDs or the factors that contribute to counsellors’ attitudes. Dr. Hubley and Cornfield’s research highlights the importance of providing more support for counsellors to ensure better service to clients with SUDs.


In this episode of Fooknconversations, Dr. Nicholas Ng-A-Fook interviews Dr. William F. Pinar, Tetsuo T. Aoki Professor, Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy. During their conversation, Dr. Pinar shares his perspectives as a curriculum theorist and lived experiences in relation to the 2020 Pandemic and anti-Black racism protests in the United States. He discusses some of the following concepts: systemic inequities, different temporal dimensions of currere, curriculum policy reform and reorganization, populist movements, instrumentalism, existential philosophy, cautionary notes on the use of technology, social media, Black feminist autobiographical research, allegories of an American South, Weimar Republic, and the Harlem Renaissance.


In this episode of Fooknconversations, Dr. Nicholas Ng-A-Fook interviews Dr. Rita Irwin, Professor, Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy, and former Associate Dean of Teacher Education. During their conversation, Dr. Irwin shares her perspectives as an a/rtist, r/esearcher, t/eacher, and writer in the “Wake” of the COVID-19 Pandemic. She discusses some of the following concepts: slow scholarship, walking as an embodiment “being” and “becoming” in the world beyond the ineffable, gender issues, ongoing evolution of a/r/tography, existential potentials, renderings of living artistic inquiries, practices, processes, and concepts as methods, new materialism, image-making with graduate students, intravention versus intervention, teaching Grade 6, limits of representationalism and her pedagogy.


In this episode of Fooknconversations, Dr. Nicholas Ng-A-Fook interviews Dr. Lindsay Gibson, Assistant Professor, Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy. Prior to his work in higher education, Dr. Gibson taught secondary school history and social studies within the Kelowna public schooling system for twelve years. During their conversation, Dr. Gibson shares his perspectives on what we might learn from the discipline of history education in relation to the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic and COVID-19. He addresses some of the following concepts: trauma, equity, historical thinking, historical consciousness, virtual reality, construction of historical representations, teaching ethical judgement, historical harms and Twitter curation.


In this TEDx Talk, Dr. Candace Kaleimamoowahinekapu Galla, Associate Professor, Department of Language and Literacy Education, discusses the ripples generated at the birth of the Hawaiian language revitalization movement. The tide and current have generated waves that are now thousands of Hawaiian language speakers and have inspired many other Indigenous language communities worldwide. Dr. Galla was born and raised on the island of Hawaiʻi. She was immersed in hula (traditional Hawaiian dance) and was taught by her Hawaiian and Filipino Kumu Hula (hula master) mother. From her Filipino father, she learned to develop a deep connection to the ocean and was taught to appreciate, respect, and embrace the ocean. She formally learned ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi at a time when there was an ideology that “learning and/or speaking Hawaiian would not be relevant in the ‘real world.’” Her scholarly and professional activities, teaching and service reflect her commitment to mobilize Hawaiian language education and Indigenous language education and revitalization, locally, nationally, and globally.


In this Disability History Association podcast episode (episode 17), Dr. Jason Ellis, Associate Professor, Department of Educational Studies discusses his book A Class By Themselves?: The Origins of Special Education in Toronto and Beyond. The book provides an erudite and balanced history of special needs education, an early twentieth century educational innovation that continues to polarize school communities across Canada, the United States, and beyond. Dr. Ellis situates the evolution of this educational innovation in its proper historical context to explore the rise of intelligence testing, the decline of child labour and rise of vocational guidance, emerging trends in mental hygiene and child psychology, and the implementation of a new progressive curriculum. At the core of this study are the students. The book is the first to draw deeply on rich archival sources, including 1000 pupil records of young people with learning difficulties, who attended public schools between 1918 and 1945. Dr. Ellis uses these records to retell individual stories that illuminate how disability filtered down through the school system’s many nooks and crannies to mark disabled students as different from (and often inferior to) other school children. The book sheds new light on these and other issues by bringing special education’s curious past to bear on its constantly contested present.


Multi-podality Podcast Series

April 23 to July 15, 2018
five episodes

Graduate students in the Department of Language and Literacy Education created a five-part podcast that explores multimodality in its many forms, the ways people engage in multimodal communication and expression across a range of activities, as well as how different ways of multimodal teaching and learning can build a better understanding of concepts and create a sense of community. The graduate students encourage others to think outside the normative box of multimodality and reflect upon their practices to discover new ways of learning and sharing knowledge.


In this We Teach Languages podcast episode, Dr. Ryuko Kubota, Professor, Department of Language and Literacy Education, discusses common misconceptions in English Language Teaching, including how beliefs about native speakers, whiteness, and legitimate forms of language contribute to the general public’s understanding of who is a good language teacher.